white - Christian Fogarolli

white

 

Christian Fogarolli
curated by Chiara Ianeselli


Opening on Friday February 1st, 2013 7:00 pm
February 2nd, 2013 – March 31st, 2013 

 

 

Arte Boccanera is pleased to present white of Christian Fogarolli, following the worldwide recognition of dOCUMENTA (13). The artist shows in the exhibition space the projects lost identities, worthy of the international scene in Kassel, and blackout.

 

In the work lost identities, Christian Fogarolli - interested from the very beginning of his career in questions challenging the essence of the identity dimension – explores the archive of an Italian psychiatric institution. Working with the examined documentation allowed the establishment of a close dialogue, able to go further and deeper than the first shocking harshness of the images, expanding the boundaries of the project and giving new presence to a passed temporal dimension. In fact, the seriality of the pictures selected in the mental hospital, is immediately checkmated by the artist Fogarolli through a continuous metamorphosis of shapes and used techniques, giving birth to unexpected standpoints, which would be otherwise not historically accessible. In line with the approach of research and experimentation that characterizes his work, Fogarolli explores his thresholds of perception of the terrible and the viewers’ ones, placing them in the middle of the concept through site-specific installations that cannot fail to surprise.

The underlying melody continues in the second project installed, blackout, which allows the visitor to touch the accumulation of a lifetime of Miss Swann, whose alienation fascinates the observer inevitably involved in the anxiety of collecting. The video Hotel-Dieu documents this research through and for madness, in such a depth to become expression itself. Released for the opening the exhibition catalogue, in Italian and English, with the curator’s essay, the works’ on show images.

 

Christian Fogarolli (Trento, 1983) obtains in 2010 the Master Inside the image: study, diagnosis and restoration of antique, modern, contemporary paintings, and the following year he graduates in the Master’s Degree of Management and Conservation of Cultural Heritage at the University of Trento. Among recent acknowledgments The Worldly House, dOCUMENTA (13) – Kassel, and The magnificent obsession, (2012/2013) Mart – Rovereto as special guest, the 54th Venice Biennale, Italian Pavilion, Turin.

 

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Info
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Curated by Chiara Ianeselli
Arte Boccanera  via Milano 128/130, Trento

Opening hours:  Tuesday – Saturday 10 am - 1 pm, 4 - 7 pm or on appointment
www.arteboccanera.com  info@arteboccanera.com  p. +39 0461.984206 | m + 39 340.5747013

Delacroix painting at Lens Louvre gallery defaced with permanent marker

image


A woman has been arrested after defacing a painting by Eugène Delacroix at the Louvre satellite museum in Lens. The 28-year-old told police she had scrawled “AE911” with an indelible marker on the painting, Liberty Leading the People, to draw attention to an organisation that appears to believe the 9/11 attacks were a conspiracy…

Read more here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/feb/08/delacroix-painting-defaced-louvre

Marie AntoinetteLouise Élisabeth Vigée-Le Brun1783 National Gallery of Art, Washington, USA

Marie Antoinette
Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Le Brun
1783 
National Gallery of Art, Washington, USA

In Advance of the Broken Arm (Fourth version, after lost original of November 1915)Marcel Duchamp1964Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, USA 

In Advance of the Broken Arm (Fourth version, after lost original of November 1915)
Marcel Duchamp
1964
Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, USA 

Grimani Breviary: The Month of DecemberFlemish Minaturist 1490-1510Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, Venice, Italy

Grimani Breviary: The Month of December
Flemish Minaturist 
1490-1510
Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, Venice, Italy

Mosaic with Street MusiciansDioskourides of Samos1st century BCEThe Naples National Archaeological Museum, Naples, ItalyThis Mosaic with Street Musicians, signed by Dioskourides of Samos was found in the so-called Villa of Cicero near the ancient city of Pompeii. The mosaic depicts an episode from a comedy, since the figures are wearing theatrical masks. The figures are playing musical instruments often connected with the cult of Cybele: the tambourine, small cymbals and the double flute.
This particular mosaic dates from the first century BCE, but the scene is known from the 3rd century BCE onward. It is found in paintings and mosaics until the 3rd century CE. The play is not immediately identifiable from this mosaic. (http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/1089_Mosaic_with_Street_Musicians.html)

Mosaic with Street Musicians
Dioskourides of Samos
1st century BCE
The Naples National Archaeological Museum, Naples, Italy

This Mosaic with Street Musicians, signed by Dioskourides of Samos was found in the so-called Villa of Cicero near the ancient city of Pompeii. The mosaic depicts an episode from a comedy, since the figures are wearing theatrical masks. The figures are playing musical instruments often connected with the cult of Cybele: the tambourine, small cymbals and the double flute.

This particular mosaic dates from the first century BCE, but the scene is known from the 3rd century BCE onward. It is found in paintings and mosaics until the 3rd century CE. The play is not immediately identifiable from this mosaic. (http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/1089_Mosaic_with_Street_Musicians.html)

Girl with a Pearl EarringJan Vermeer (Johannes Vermeer, Johan Vermeer)c. 1665-1666 Royal Cabinet of Paintings Mauritshuis, The Hague, South Holland, The Netherlands Why is the Girl with the pearl earring Vermeer’s best-loved painting? It must have something to do with the fact that the girl looks over her shoulder, as though hoping to see who is standing behind her. This draws the viewer into the picture, suggesting that he is the one who has made the girl turn her head.
Equally important, though, are Vermeer’s fresh colours, virtuoso technique and subtle rendering of light effects. The turban is enlivened, for example, with the small highlights that are Vermeer’s trademark. The pearl, too, is very special, consisting of little more than two brushstrokes: a bright accent at its upper left and the soft reflection of the white collar on its underside.
Then there is the girl herself, who gazes at us, wide-eyed, her sensual mouth parted. She makes an uninhibited, somewhat expectant impression that cannot help exciting our interest, even though we have no idea who she is. (mauritshuis.nl)

Girl with a Pearl Earring
Jan Vermeer (Johannes Vermeer, Johan Vermeer)
c. 1665-1666 
Royal Cabinet of Paintings Mauritshuis, The Hague, South Holland, The Netherlands 

Why is the Girl with the pearl earring Vermeer’s best-loved painting? It must have something to do with the fact that the girl looks over her shoulder, as though hoping to see who is standing behind her. This draws the viewer into the picture, suggesting that he is the one who has made the girl turn her head.

Equally important, though, are Vermeer’s fresh colours, virtuoso technique and subtle rendering of light effects. The turban is enlivened, for example, with the small highlights that are Vermeer’s trademark. The pearl, too, is very special, consisting of little more than two brushstrokes: a bright accent at its upper left and the soft reflection of the white collar on its underside.

Then there is the girl herself, who gazes at us, wide-eyed, her sensual mouth parted. She makes an uninhibited, somewhat expectant impression that cannot help exciting our interest, even though we have no idea who she is. (mauritshuis.nl)

The Art Critic (Saturday Evening Post Cover April 16, 1955)Norman Rockwell 1955The Norman Rockwell Museum of Stockbridge, Stockbridge, MA, USA

The Art Critic (Saturday Evening Post Cover April 16, 1955)
Norman Rockwell
1955
The Norman Rockwell Museum of Stockbridge, Stockbridge, MA, USA

Untitled Mark Rothko1968Museum of Modern Art, New York City, New York, USA 

Untitled
Mark Rothko
1968
Museum of Modern Art, New York City, New York, USA